City Lifestyle

Want to start a publication?

Learn More
Navajo Citizen Jennifer Berg specializes in wearable works of artwork meant to keep one wam and comfy.

Featured Article

Purpose & Pattern

Exhibit C Gallery Showcases Artworks That Fuse Tradition, Culture and Self-Expression

A winter sweater. A warm quilt. A woven basket to hold items in their own unique place. These are not just functional objects but beautiful works of art that require meticulous attention and time to create.

The new exhibit, titled "Purpose and Pattern," on display through June at Exhibit C Gallery in Bricktown, Oklahoma City, celebrates the fusion of tradition, culture and self-expression through patterns in art. The mediums featured in this exhibit include basketry, pottery, intarsia woodwork and textile design.

“This exhibition showcases a stunning display of textures and patterns in various forms,” said Paige Williams Shepherd, director of tourism for the Chickasaw Nation. “Whether it’s beautiful wood inlaying, expressive pottery or ornate textile design, there is an expression of art to meet any art lover’s interest.”

The exhibition features the works of Jennifer Berg (Navajo), Michael Dart (Cherokee), Tara Largo (Navajo), Lisa Rutherford (Cherokee) and Mary Wilds (Chickasaw).

JENNIFER BERG

Navajo Citizen Jennifer Berg fashions stunning knitwear that makes a statement.

“My work is a wearable piece of artwork. It’s made to keep you warm, comfy and a conversation starter,” Jennifer says. “I love using wool and the textiles that my great-grandmother used when she would weave. Also, making items that take care of those I love by keeping them warm brings me so much joy."

MICHAEL DART

A Cherokee National Treasure, Michael Dart specializes in Cherokee and Southeastern tribal basketry and contemporary fiber art. He carefully selects materials from nature to create his basketry and ensures that he leaves something behind in return for the resources he uses.

“As Tradition Keepers, we were given a great gift, but also a great responsibility to be caretakers of the earth. We must do our part to ensure there will still be natural materials for future generations,” he says.

TARA LARGO

Navajo Artist and New Mexico resident Tara Largo uses intarsia woodworking, a form of woodworking where pieces of wood are carefully fitted together like a puzzle. Her work results in a stunning piece of art with depth and texture, despite only starting in this medium two years ago.

“I fell in love with woodworking after I learned how to use my first power tool when I created a wall piece for myself during the pandemic. It was something new and exciting,” she says.

MARY WILDS

Mary Wilds learned how to quilt and embroider from her grandmother, while her mother taught her how to make garments.

“I am so proud to be a member of the Chickasaw Nation and love having the opportunity to tell my family history through my art,” she says. “I continue to tell the stories behind my art so that I can teach all interested persons about my very rich Chickasaw heritage.”

LISA RUTHERFORD

Lisa Rutherford grew up near her Cherokee roots in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. She is a Cherokee National Treasure for pottery. Lisa's art is inspired by ancestral arts after learning some art mediums are endangered.

“I feel a responsibility to make sure these arts are preserved and passed on,” she shares. Lisa takes on new themes, technologies and materials while creating her artwork, including experimenting with new clays and stains.

For her, art serves as a means of educating the public about First American heritage.

“I hope that it opens dialogue and helps create awareness of Native issues,” she said.

For more information, visit ExhibitCGallery.com.

  • Navajo Citizen Jennifer Berg specializes in wearable works of artwork meant to keep one wam and comfy.
  • Michael Dart, a Cherokee National Treasure, specializes in Cherokee and Southeastern tribal basketry and contemporary fiber art.
  • Navajo Artist and New Mexico resident Tara Largo uses intarsia woodworking, a form of woodworking where pieces of wood are carefully fitted together like a puzz
  • Lisa Rutherford, a Cherokee National Treasure for Pottery, enjoys experimenting with new clays and stains.
  • Chickasaw Nation artist Mary Wilds enjoys telling her family history through her art