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An Equine Connection

Danny Chapparo teaches people how to grow the connection to their horses—by practicing ashva yoga.

“Ashva is Sanskrit for ‘horse,’ so ashva yoga basically means horse yoga or equestrian yoga," says Danny Chapparo, Castle Rock resident and owner of Ashva Yoga. “I chose that name because I wanted to combine the two teachings and my two passions, horses and yoga.”

An experienced yoga instructor, Danny opened her own yoga studio in 2010; in 2019 she sold the business to a former student (it’s now Buka Yoga on Wilcox Street) so she could focus on growing her ashva yoga practice.

Danny started teaching yoga with horses in 2012, “but it took a little bit longer to get things going because I only owned one horse at the time and I wasn’t quite sure how it was going to work, she recalls. “You know, you have things in your head and you have these ideas and you're exploring new things that nobody has done in the area. So, you're a little hesitant at first.” Then, some of her yoga students who owned a ranch toward Colorado Springs offered to let her teach with some of their horses. “They said to me, ‘Why don't you just come and teach us a class and see what happens,’ and it went really well and I just kept growing from there.”

These days, Danny travels all over Douglas County, and even as far as Longmont and Lafayette, teaching horse owners how to become stronger and more connected to their horses. She teaches at conferences and hosts retreats. “Last year we went to Costa Rica, we're going to go back this year where I partner with ranches.”

If you don’t own a horse but are interested in giving ashva yoga a try, Danny can find you a horse to “borrow.” But she prefers to work with people who have their own horse. “I find that teaching horse owners the most beneficial. I want them to build that partnership, that relationship, and that connection with their horse.”

Ashva yoga is a very gentle yoga practice—no previous yoga experience. “It's all about connecting with your horse—breathing, being present, being aware. A lot of times, I feel when we learn riding, we have our trainers, and we'll focus on an end goal. Whether you're learning to jump or rope, you're most focused on the end goal. And a lot of times, the process in between gets kind of lost.”

The ultimate benefit, Danny explains, is to become more mindful, more aware, and stronger. “And I don't mean stronger just on a physical level, although we do physical yoga poses—we start next to the horse and then on the horse—but also stronger as a leader that once we are more focused, we know exactly what we want, and we envision that the horse feeds off of that strength.”

Equestrian yoga is a beautiful practice that complements any discipline of riding,” Danny concludes. Every time you practice, you gain a deeper understanding and awareness of yourself, which, at the same time, helps you improve your partnership and connection with your horse.” 

Ashva Yoga, Castle Rock
719-351-9837
ashvayoga.com
info@ashvayoga.com
 


When we learn riding, we have our trainers, and we'll focus on an end goal. Whether you're learning to jump or rope, you're most focused on the end goal. And a lot of times, the process in between gets kind of lost.” —Danny Chapparo

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