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Macy has captured the essence of a mid century beach party at "The Lucine"

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Laid Back at The Lucine

Retro reimagined by midcentury maestros in Galveston's boutique hotel

Maybe only the true heart of a musician hears the lure of a beach utopia.  Beleaguered oilmen from Midland and sun worshipers from San Antonio will find much to love in the new Hotel Lucine.  Bass player Dave Jacoby and his wife, Keath, who was born on the island have much to be proud of.  Along with partner Robert Marcus, a New York real estate developer who has relocated with his wife, Ashlye, (a childhood friend of Keath’s) emphasize the high on expectations, low on pretense aspects of their vision for Hotel Lucine, the island’s latest entry into Galveston’s hotel scene.  They’ve redesigned a circa 1963 midcentury modern hotel that opened first as Treasure Isle at 1002 Seawall. 

After shepherding a $165M hotel in Las Vegas through development and debut in 2016, the Jacobys returned to Galveston where Keath was born.  The Jacobys partnered up with Marcus in 2021 as he bid NYC adieu in favor of the coastal breezes and less hectic lifestyle.  The team bought The Pearl Inn with a goal of modernizing the hotel’s 61 rooms and instilling a welcoming, hip vibe to the midcentury modern jewel. Shawn Ullman and Jeff Soloman are the two partners who came in from Austin for a recent leadership meeting. Solomon, who grew up in Memorial, brought his family who enjoyed breakfast in The Den before a walk on the beach. 

The careful renovation at Hotel Lucine resonates with thoughtful respect for the storied past of Galveston, a city that has embraced renovation out of necessity since the Great Fire of Galveston that decimated 40 city blocks and 500 buildings in 1885 followed by the Great Storm of 1900 when a 15-foot storm surge flooded the city. After the storm, the city built the Seawall and raised the elevation of the new structures to come and rebuilding commenced with vigor. 

The entire concept is female centric, with executive chef Leila Ortiz leading the culinary curation and general manager Lacye Frazier overseeing operations.  So far, the hotel has attracted an upscale crowd of writers, musicians, UTMB students and out-of-towners who enjoy a more elevated dinner at The Fancy, the hotel's restaurant offering "fine-ish dining." Not to be missed are the scrumptious cups of Corduroy Coffee at sunrise or drinks sunset at the rooftop bar where the Sunset & Sounds summer series brings in bands from Austin, Houston like the soulful Kam Franklin of The Suffers fame, Galveston’s Robert Kuhn and the Texas Gentlemen, a quintet known for their blend of funk, soul, country, R&B, and Southern rock and unforgettable ballads. The Saturday night band performances are planned through Labor Day. 

The move has also given Dave Jacoby a chance to work on his music in a thoughtful way. An excellent bass player, he collaborated with Robert Kuhn who released a new album during the pandemic, Some Kind of Love. Dave and Keath also own the property across the street from Hotel Lucine where they plan a beach club. 

Millennials gather around the retro pool, centered between the horseshoe anchored by patio dining. Pool passes are available to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 a.m. daily and can be reserved by phone or email" https://www.hotellucine.com/pool-passes.  The spacious rooms are appointed with alarm clocks that look like that sat on Darrin and Samantha Stevens’ bedside table in Bewitched. Original pink, blue or teals found on 60s-era postcards of the hotel color the tiles of the bathrooms and there are doors from the Galveston Historical Foundation’s warehouse off the lobby. “We wanted a strong, feminine persona,’ said Rob Baird, of the Austin design firm Preacher, which created the hotel’s typeface, pastel color palette and name. Keath has a saying that ‘Galveston is a peculiar woman.’ And the city does have this blend of Southern and Texas culture.” Another Austin firm, Kartwheel Studio, stripped away the uninspired, Home Depotesque renovations at the Pearl Inn, restoring the feel of a midcentury motor lodge with its classic zig-zag roof.

 "In developing Hotel Lucine, we very consciously selected creative partners, investors, and vendors that are not only good at what they do, but who we also get along well personally," says Jacoby. "In the case of David Clark and Kartwheel Studio, there was no question that his vision best aligned with ours. He took our initial plans and translated them into a reality that far exceeded our expectations."

 Kartwheel also did The Cathedral, Knob Creek and the Moxie.  They designed all of the furniture and lighting at Hotel Lucine as well, giving all a freshness while remaining faithful to the building’s original spirit. 

So far, the hotel has attracted an upscale crowd of writers, musicians, UTMB students and out-of-towners who enjoy a more elevated dinner at The Fancy, the hotels restaurant offering "fine-ish dining". 

“We wanted a strong, feminine persona,’ said Rob Baird, of the Austin design firm Preacher, which created the hotel’s typeface, pastel color palette and name. Keath has a saying that ‘Galveston is a peculiar woman.’"

  • Midcentury Modern Jewel
  • Owners Dave Jacoby and Robert Marcus in "The Fancy" restaurant
  • Owners
  • "By the Sea" on the roof top lounge
  • Rooftop bar serving "Hotel Lucine Old Fashioned" with a twist
  • Macy has captured the essence of a mid century beach party at "The Lucine"
  • Pink tiled bathrooms in your guestroom
  • minimalist designs give this space plenty of room to create your own oasis
  • Hotel Lucine on The Seawall
  • Details like the Italian imported tiles create a beautiful stay awhile feeling
  • The Den is your home throughout the stay with great communal energy
  • Sunset on the rooftop bar